1. one of the best movies ever.

    undeadcritic:

    “I don’t know what the hell’s in there, but it’s weird and pissed off, whatever it is.”
    The Thing | 1982 | Dir John Carpenter

    (via spidersexx)

    2 years ago  /  1,931 notes  /  Source: jamesbadgedale

  2. neuholm:

Dwarf elephant

awww

    neuholm:

    Dwarf elephant

    awww

    (via greatplates)

    2 years ago  /  121 notes  /  Source: neuholm

  3. scientificillustration:

Primate Faces - Plate 38 
From ‘Die Vollstandigste Naturgeschichte der Affen’ (The Complete Natural History of the Apes) by H.G. Ludwig Reichenbac

    scientificillustration:

    Primate Faces - Plate 38 

    From ‘Die Vollstandigste Naturgeschichte der Affen’ (The Complete Natural History of the Apes) by H.G. Ludwig Reichenbac

    2 years ago  /  283 notes  /  Source: pin.primate.wisc.edu

  4. Lode mining claim regulations in the US in 1954 (there’s another page but you get the idea). I found this in a little book that was supposed to be a guide to uranium prospecting which apparently was going to be the new gold rush for someone. There are some nice ads for instruments too, I’ll post them. From Proctor, Hyatt, Bullock, Uranium, where it is and how to find it.

    Lode mining claim regulations in the US in 1954 (there’s another page but you get the idea). I found this in a little book that was supposed to be a guide to uranium prospecting which apparently was going to be the new gold rush for someone. There are some nice ads for instruments too, I’ll post them. From Proctor, Hyatt, Bullock, Uranium, where it is and how to find it.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  5. The “wearable exoskeletal structure” that was under development at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory in 1964, probably one of the first attempts on building such devices. From Chris Hables Gray, The Cyborg Handbook, 1995.

    The “wearable exoskeletal structure” that was under development at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory in 1964, probably one of the first attempts on building such devices. From Chris Hables Gray, The Cyborg Handbook, 1995.

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  6. turnofthecentury:

Found this and thought of your great blog. We’re all big fans here at the museum.
TEN WAYS TO COMMIT SUICIDE
Wearing thin shoes and stockings and insufficient clothing in cold and rainy weather ; leading a lazy, excited theater-going, dancing life ; sleeping on feathers in a 7 by 9 room ; eating hot, stimulating food, too fast and a great deal too much of it at improper times ; beginning with tea and coffee in childhood and adding tobacco and spirits in due time ; marrying in haste and living in continual ferment thereafter ; following unhealthy occupations to make money ; taking bitters and confections and gormandizing between meals  ; giving way to fits of passion, or keeping in perpetual worry ; going to bed at midnight and getting up at noon, and eating when you catch it. To which may be added a recipe for killing children ; paregorics, cordials, candy and rich cake ; and when they are made sick thereby, mercury, tartar-emetic, castor oil and sulphur.
found in the collection of the Dufferin County Museum & Archives. Source: Orangeville Sun, 1876.
Awwww, this is so FANTASTIC, I think they’re right now more than ever;]
thank You so much!!!
love t.o.t.c. 

    turnofthecentury:

    Found this and thought of your great blog. We’re all big fans here at the museum.

    TEN WAYS TO COMMIT SUICIDE

    Wearing thin shoes and stockings and insufficient clothing in cold and rainy weather ; leading a lazy, excited theater-going, dancing life ; sleeping on feathers in a 7 by 9 room ; eating hot, stimulating food, too fast and a great deal too much of it at improper times ; beginning with tea and coffee in childhood and adding tobacco and spirits in due time ; marrying in haste and living in continual ferment thereafter ; following unhealthy occupations to make money ; taking bitters and confections and gormandizing between meals  ; giving way to fits of passion, or keeping in perpetual worry ; going to bed at midnight and getting up at noon, and eating when you catch it. To which may be added a recipe for killing children ; paregorics, cordials, candy and rich cake ; and when they are made sick thereby, mercury, tartar-emetic, castor oil and sulphur.

    found in the collection of the Dufferin County Museum & Archives. Source: Orangeville Sun, 1876.

    Awwww, this is so FANTASTIC, I think they’re right now more than ever;]

    thank You so much!!!

    love t.o.t.c. 

    2 years ago  /  424 notes  /  Source: turnofthecentury

  7. Some signs in ASL (I like the one for “save” in particular), notice that they are on page 33, a coincidence? I don’t think so. From Rice, Sign Language for Everyone

    Some signs in ASL (I like the one for “save” in particular), notice that they are on page 33, a coincidence? I don’t think so. From Rice, Sign Language for Everyone

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  8. British political cartoon of 1910 in which (according to the author of this book) an ape, symbolising socialism, is attacking Britain, it sure looks apelike. From Vernon Reynolds, The Apes

    British political cartoon of 1910 in which (according to the author of this book) an ape, symbolising socialism, is attacking Britain, it sure looks apelike. From Vernon Reynolds, The Apes

    2 years ago  /  0 notes

  9. archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]


Try to imagine her. Done? ok, don’t you want a golden prostetic eye too now? I do

    archiemcphee:

    Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

    Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

    [The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

    So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

    [via TYWKIWDBI]

    Try to imagine her. Done? ok, don’t you want a golden prostetic eye too now? I do

    (via discoverynews)

    2 years ago  /  146,945 notes  /  Source: tywkiwdbi.blogspot.com

  10. trust me I’ve found THE BEST TUMBLR EVER

    trust me I’ve found THE BEST TUMBLR EVER

    (via scientificillustration)

    2 years ago  /  54 notes  /  Source: corinnejones